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Photo by Timothy Buck on Unsplash

The gentle vibration on my wrist wakes me just a couple of minutes after 6 a.m. My sleep cycle is reliably tracked by my Apple Watch Series 6, the perfect moment to wake me. Neither in a deep sleep phase nor a REM phase.

First, of the things I do, engrained by daily habit for months now, I put my watch on its charger. I am worried that it won’t get enough time there to get fully charged. The time that I need to get dressed for my running outfit and boost up with all the supplements for the day. …


We are still in the middle of the pandemic and already thinking about what will be different afterward. But we might be overstating the lasting effects that the crisis mode will bare for us.

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Photo by Timon Studler on Unsplash

The ongoing Top-10 lists out in the news about what will change after the COVID-Crisis has passed, and life has gone back to a „new“ normal seem very consistent. The lists range from a higher focus on the health care system to a complete transformation of the educational system. The working from home will be the new standard while we will be limiting physical interactions with each other and strive for new standards in hygiene and adopt minimalism but also stock up already for the next lockdowns we will be anxiously awaiting now every year. …


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Photo by Arseny Togulev on Unsplash

Any current discussion about a future ahead for humanity is filled with buzz-words like AI, Mars-Colonization, and the Smartness of almost everything that is not human. But what is mostly missing is any discourse on how the human being and it’s work, as the most necessary act of daily lives and the provision of all its prerequisites, will fit in that future. There is less discussion about the future of work than there are about goals that seem more far off than any science-fiction-like how we will live on Mars.

And all we know about human labor is about to change — not in a distant future of a hundred years, where we can leave that be for the next generation to find out, but within the timeframe of 20 to 40 years. …


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Photo by Colin Sabatier on Unsplash

Exactly two weeks ago, I put the new Apple Magic Keyboard to the test, and it transformed my use of the iPad Pro almost instantly.

So far, I cherished the iPad Pro as a mobile device that led me to do more writing on the go. I was still heavily relying on my iMac to do the editing part and final touches for my daily texts. The iPad Pro, more or less, was a scribbling device. Something to jot down ideas in a more organized fashion other than paper-notebooks and post-its. I could write on the train and on trips where I would not have immediate access to my iMac. That way of working even posed the advantage of focusing more on content instead of formatting. A problem that is still with me even after years of writing. …


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In recent years I have been through every iteration of the iPad Pro. I have done most of the things it has become known for as an almost perfect mobile device. I have done photo and video editing on it, done a fair share of writing on it, and used both generations of the Apple Pencil on it. But still, something was always missing. Even more missing if you were looking to replace your laptop.

Especially when you are mostly doing writing on it, like me, the crucial point was always finding a suitable keyboard to go with it. And neither Apple nor others like Logitech or Brydge were able to deliver something that was adequately fueling the capabilities and advantages of the iPad Pro. …


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Photo by Mollie Sivaram on Unsplash

In this very singular times, streaming services like Netflix or Amazon Prime Video deliver a better part of the means to save our sanity. They successfully distract us from the worries that are beyond the proverbial four walls symbolizing our currently only existing anti-dote.
Moreover, even the limited content that is now getting released does give us the essential feeling that the world outside is still turning even if we don’t seem to experience that anymore in our isolation.

Nevertheless, the fear of reaching the bottom of our own thoughtfully curated Netflix playlist is even so real as it is dreading.
What will happen if there is nothing new to watch? …


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Photo by Dustin Scarpitti on Unsplash

I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. (Henry David Thoreau)

So minimalism is a thing. I came by it a couple of years ago, was intrigued by the accordingly named documentary on Netflix and immediately got hooked by the stories of Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus. I felt the same pain, was at some point in a comparable dilemma. And I thought, well, I can do that lifestyle as well. …


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Photo by Agnieszka Kowalczyk on Unsplash

So you say you love music? Is that so? Well, some once said, show me you vinyl shelf and I tell you who you are. Oh, you have no vinyls? Well don’t worry, CDs it is then. Works the same, I guess. Really? No black lacquered CD tower in the corner of your living room? But does that mean … I mean, c’mon…really? You still got tapes? Hey, I love some good mixtapes. But no, not even that?
Judging by that awkward silence right now, I would guess you are the streaming type. Please don’t be offended by my sudden and sharp inhale. I am not judging. I have been down that road. And even today, when I am tired, just exhausted after a long day of stress at work, I will also just kick back and stream some random playlist that titles my mood while not caring who is on that list. But I can control it and stop streaming anytime I want. I just do it recreationally, you know. Sometimes it just makes me feel better. Ok, revise that. That is going in the wrong direction here. …


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Photo by Jp Valery on Unsplash

Yesterday I stumbled upon Tim Denning’s post. Great job on the headline, I was hooked.

Inevitably, someone talking about that obscene amount of money for a month’s work on Medium grabbed my attention. Not because I wanted to be placed in time to earn that money on Medium, like best case tomorrow. No, I wanted to see what Tim has to say with that headline. I wanted to see if there is any substance behind it.

It’s only natural to want to feel the price tag on your work.

My reading list is full of articles about how to earn money here. Recent headlines read something in the ballpark of, Medium changed, and it doubled my income. Well, good for all of them. By far, and that means that the Big Bang feels closer to me than the instance of earning any money in Medium, I am not there yet. Maybe never. Halfheartedly I try not to care about those things. Well, more quarterheartedly. Views are lovely, reads are better, and claps, well, we moved beyond that now. And it’s only a natural progression to want to feel a price tag on your work. …


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Photo by James Pond on Unsplash

As the analog aficionado, I have become over the past years, I seek comfort if the focussed work with intentional limitation. This limitation — let’s call this overtly meaningful a quest — led me amongst other things eventually to the only tool that has one singular purpose when it was invented, designed, built and perfected: The Typewriter.

Only a few things that resurfaced along with the analog movement today brought me such productive moments as a 1953 manufactured Smith-Corona Sterling, although many other machines followed in my collection. A Skywriter, the famous Olympia SM3 as well as Olympia Splendid, and boy, she is splendid. …

About

Sebastian Stapf

Analogue-guy being digitally overwhelmed…oh, and of course a writer. And I don’t write infomercials and don’t write for a niche, but what comes to my mind.

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